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Emergent day to you. 2010-04-22 is my knowmad birthday. Think I understood the word. More to emerge.
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    The human species is rapidly and indisputably moving towards the technological singularity. The cadence of the flow of information and innovation in...

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    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.


    Why artificial intelligence research has been working on the wrong problem. Slow down to learn from Monica Anderson.

    My talk at Stanford University on May 17, 2014 at the Advancing Humanity Symposium – organized by Stanford Transhumanist Association.
    I discuss Dual Process Theory, The Frame Problem, and some consequences of these for AI research.
    Dual Process Theory is the idea that the human mind has two disparate modes of thinking - Subconscious Intuitive Understanding on one hand and Conscious Logical Reasoning on the other.
    The Frame Problem is the idea that we cannot make comprehensive Models of the World because the world changes behind our backs and any Model we make is immediately obsolete.
    The conclusion is that AI research since the 1950s has been solving the wrong problem.
    I discuss Model Free Methods as an alternative path to AI, capable of sidestepping the Frame Problem.



    https://vimeo.com/111967600
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    Gunther Sonnenfeld:
    "The realities of knowledge acquisition, distribution and retention are very different in a world in which the past, present and future are constantly being rewritten. Look no further than the Internet and the social web for overwhelming evidence of the shifts in how we acquire, distribute and retain information, or what we construe as knowledge."

    ...

    "What if we could all accept the precept that what we actually know is dwarfed by what we don’t know, and that’s actually a good thing?

    To build from the example of an Internet economy, we are conductors of information that shifts the idea of control away from what’s ‘ownable’ and towards a dynamic of shared distribution and responsibility. To take it further, the idea isn’t necessarily to stake claim to a domain, but to unpack it such that the next best inferences and outcomes can occur.

    As the graphic above implies, there are some interesting alignments — human attributes, to be more specific — with all that we don’t know.

    While what you know is considered knowledge, what you don’t know is or can be a heightened form of awareness. It’s analogous to knowing what not to do. It’s the kind of foundational learning that enables us to make better choices and create better options for ourselves.

    What you think you know or what you might know, take on forms of reason, imagination, and sometimes, outright delusion. In the same way we might intuit a scenario or imagine an outcome, we can also delude ourselves into thinking that a present reality doesn’t exist (such as a failing business). Whether it does or doesn’t is also tied to the awareness of why what we might know actually matters.

    What you want to know and what you don’t know that you don’t know (the unknown unknowns) take on forms of curiosity and discovery. Wanting, doing and seeing or understanding become critical factors in shaping a new reality around what we don’t know. As such, we become wiser as we learn about what we didn’t know before, or what we still might not know going forward.

    Seem obvious? It probably isn’t, considering how often we repeat the same mistakes based on what we think we know."
    ...

    Experience The Power of Not Knowing
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    Systems thinking is relevant to all professions and academic disciplines that deal with life in one way or another—with living organisms, social systems, or ecosystems. Systems thinking is inherently multidisciplinary and I hope our textbook will help to create a common language for students of all disciplines.

    The language of systems thinking came out of that crisis scientists confronted in the 1920s. Ever since Descartes, they had been searching for the smallest particle—from organisms to cells to molecules to quarks. But when they thought they had found the fundamental constituents of matter, they suddenly realized there are no fundamental constituents. It is all a web of connections and interrelations.

    Systems thinking thus helps us to understand how all the problems we confront are interconnected. There are no isolated solutions. We need interconnected solutions. The problem of energy cannot be solved by finding cheaper sources of energy. If we had hydrogen fusion right now, or some new energy source that was cheap and safe, all our other problems would only get worse. If you fuel a system that is out of balance, you just have the same system but on steroids. We would damage the rainforests, deplete the ecosphere, pollute the air, and increase health problems. In other words, the energy problem is also a health problem and a food problem and a water problem, and it needs to be addressed as such.


    The question Marjorie Kelly asked Fritjof Capra was:

    "Your new book, The Systems View of Life, provides an overview of systems thinking for those in a broad range of professions, from economics and politics to medicine, psychology, and law. Why do you see systems thinking as valuable in so many different setting"


    - See more at: http://greattransition.org/publication/systems-thinking-and-system-change
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    One of my paid hobbies has been innovation for the company, as in making new technology work for us to help us complete our jobs for clients, easier, faster or more reliable. More than a year ago, one of my responsibilities shifted from process innovation to business development. Loving it.

    In my free time, took basic courses in project management, both waterfall and agile, read business books like Tribal Leadership and The Culture Game, all good and valuable, but none of these prompted me to post to Space Collective.

    The framework for directed innovation does. It is old enough to be proven in business and criticized in public, yet new enough (to me, anyway) to get excited about innovation insights. (You too, maybe?)

    Let's begin with quoting from one of many insightful articles from the company Strategyn, whose logo I borrowed for the image, The New Language of Innovation


    [image goes here if upload works again]


    The Language of Innovation

    Innovation

    Since people buy products and services to get a job done, innovation is defined as the process of devising a product or service concept that helps customers get a job or jobs done better. The innovation process begins with market selection and ends with a product or service concept that is approved for development. Ideally, only winning product concepts enter the development process. To be approved for development, a winning concept must also meet company success and societal criteria.

    Idea-first Approach to Innovation

    An inherently flawed approach to innovation that starts with the generation of ideas and is followed by evaluation and filtering methods that determine which ideas customers like best without ever explicitly understanding all their needs. Although this approach is popular, the chances of coming up with an idea that precisely addresses all the unmet needs of target customers is near zero. This approach is analogous to a sharpshooter trying to hit a target without knowing what the target is or a doctor prescribing a treatment without observing patient symptoms. It is a time-consuming and costly approach that may never produce a winning concept. Because it is nothing more than guesswork, it will always result in low success rates.

    Needs-first Approach to Innovation

    An approach to innovation in which companies first uncover all the customer’s needs, then determine which are unmet, and then devise solutions to address those unmet needs. Historically, the needs-first approach to innovation has been ineffective, but the approach is not inherently flawed. The approach has been ineffective because in most companies there is no agreement on what a need is, and few companies believe all the customer’s needs can be captured. They have been told for years that customers can’t articulate their needs and that customers have latent needs, neither of which is true. (See “customer need”.)

    Outcome-Driven Innovation (ODI)

    Outcome-Driven Innovation is an innovation process invented by Strategyn in 1991 that has been tested and refined for over 20 years. It is an effective needs-first approach to innovation that has an 86 percent success rate.


    That's a bold promise, and reading through their published examples, I believe this approach can deliver in many corporate cultures. The Innovation and Strategy Blog quotes Tony Ulwick, author of what customers want and Strategyn CEO, saying,"Failing fast and pivoting are not an innovation strategy"

    Looking forward to learn more.

    Full disclosure: I hold no stake in this company and am not a client, nor affiliated to officers of theirs.
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    OVERVIEW from Planetary Collective

    On the 40th anniversary of the famous ‘Blue Marble’ photograph taken of Earth from space, Planetary Collective presents a short film documenting astronauts’ life-changing stories of seeing the Earth from the outside – a perspective-altering experience often described as the Overview Effect.



    Synapsing with an interview



    Jamais Cascio - The Future and You! Security, Privacy, AI, Geoengineering

    Jamais Cascio discusses the Participatory Panopticon, Privacy & Secrecy, the ramifications of Disconnecting from the Chorus, what it means to be a Futurist, the Arc of Human Evolution, Artificial Intelligence, the Need for Meaning, Building Agents to Listen to Us, WorldChanging.com / OpenTheFuture.com, Geoengineering and the Viridian Green movement.
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    Meet Gangaji, who speaks about silence and space and writes in Hidden Treasure:

    Naturally we have been thrilled to realize that we can choose to live a different story, one we feel more in alignment with. There is yet another choice. We have the capacity to take a moment and release all stories. We can experience what it means to be nobody, uncovered even by our primary identity.

    Underneath all the stories, we can experience that deep core of ourselves that is historyless, genderless, and parentless. Naked. That presence is unencumbered by relationships and has no past and no future. In the core of our beingness we are free of definitions. Unencumbered by our definitions we experience ourselves as conscious intelligence aware of itself as open, endless space. This instant of being storyless is an instant of freedom. For even if our story is filled with light and beauty, to the degree that we define ourselves through that story, we are less free.

    After such a moment, stories are never the same. They can be present, as they most likely will be, but they no longer have the inherent power to define our reality.




    Enjoy the invitation to become conscious of what is always here, while Gangaji teaches us nothing, in 8 minutes video of Satsang, (Sanskrit सत्सङ्ग sat = true, sanga = company), a call to the collective space of refuge, this heart of space.
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    "Circular reasoning is bad mostly because it’s not very good."

    http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/begging-the-question

    Here a whole large cc-licensed poster by @jesserichardson and @somethingfornow.


    While on the topic of logical fallacies, here are their mental bedfellows, cognitive biases. You can download a PDF of the groupings of biases that occur most frequently in business. Courtesy of McKinsey & Co. https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/files/article/PDF/BiasSpread.pdf
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    In 1997 the superformula was discovered, which solved the problem of the limited symmetry of superellipses and supercircles. Supershapes like pentagons and starfish, triangles and rose sepals, flowers and leaves, can now be described by a single equation, based on the generalization of Lamé's supercircles and superellipses.

    The key step from Lamé’s supercircles was to convert the equations to polar coordinates and to add a single parameter for symmetry. It was extended into three dimensions as well.

    This discovery was published in the book “Inventing the Circle” (2001, 2003) and as Invited Special Paper in the American Journal of Botany in April 2003. Worldwide awareness was created by websites such as Nature Science update, Science News Online, and Wolfram’s Mathematica website.

    Supershapes were introduced later in the field of geometry under the general name of Gielis' curves, surfaces & -transformations, also in higher dimensions.


    Quoted from GIELIS' CURVES & SURFACES


    Bram Stolk, author of the Superformula Shape Miner for iOS writes:

    Superformula was created to have fun with mathematics. Anybody can explore the colorful universe of shapes described by a powerful formula.

    The Superformula, or Gielis-formula was first proposed by Johan Gielis. The formula can be used to define a wide range of shapes, including shapes that occur in nature.

    When describing shapes in three dimensions, two instances of the formula are applied, each with 6 parameters. This results in a 12 dimensional parameter space in which a multiverse of interesting shapes reside.

    The Superformula app is developed as a tool to mine this 12 dimensional parameter space. By swiping your finger, the space is explored, two parameters at a time. The strength of this application comes from the lightning fast calculations used to determine the shapes. The app uses an OpenGL-ES2 vertex shader to compute the shapes on the graphics hardware of the device. This means zero wait, and instant visualization of the Gielis-shape.


    User Interface of the Superformula app


    More

    EXPLORATIONS OF GIELIS CURVES & SURFACES by Genicap

    Using the Super Formula for building Super-Antennas
    by Blue Economy
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    Why Freedom of Thought Requires Free Media and Why Free Media Require Free Technology [Video, 1:03:42]

    Preserved from re-publica.de


    Media that spy on and data-mine the public are capable of destroying humanity’s most precious freedom: freedom of thought. Ensuring that media remain structured to support rather than suppress individual freedom and civic virtue requires us to achieve specific free technology and free culture goals. Our existing achievements in these directions are under assault from companies trying to bottleneck human communications or own our common culture, and states eager to control their subjects’ minds. In this talk–one of a series beginning with “The dotCommunist Manifesto” and “Die Gedanken Sind Frei”–I offer some suggestions about how the Free World should meet the challenges of the next decade.


    Sun, May 27, 2012  Permanent link
    Categories: open source, media, Freedom of Expression
    Sent to project: Polytopia
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    In debt
    Project: Polytopia


    12-year old Victoria Grant explains why her homeland, Canada, and most of the world, is in debt. April 27, 2012 at the Public Banking in America Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

    Victoria Grant from Marc Armstrong on Vimeo.



    For more information see http://www.publicbankinginstitute.org or http://www.moveourmoney.net

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