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Comment on The Uncharted Internet

Sat, Jan 19, 2008
Well, it's not that Google's search algorithms are limited... It can't really search the markup for the date since the markup doesn't really have a timestamp with it. What the thing is with a shrine to the first 100 web pages is that there's probably not an archive, and the servers that held them are probably being picked apart for usable bits in that wacky computer garbage city that China badly tries to keep secret at this moment.

This is the first website ever:
http://www.w3.org/History/19921103-hypertext/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html

speaking of poking around subdirectories, this seems to have a fair bit from ~1991 onwards:
http://www.w3.org/History/

I know http://hyperreal.org/  has been around since 1992, and I think that site eventually spawned Erowid.

What goes back all the way to the 1980's that has a really extensive and easy to peruse web archive is usenet. Take a look at http://groups.google.com  and search by date or whatever, there's tons and tons of interesting information there.

Gopher was a little bit similar to the web but is basically phased out now. Think of the web if it was more ftp-based.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gopher_(protocol)

Wikipedia also has a bit of a list. Take a look:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_websites_founded_before_1995

There's also BBS, bulletin board systems. There's archives everywhere and it's not hard to google around for old textfiles written for distribution among them dating back all the way from the early 80s or whatever. Dunno about the states but here's a list of Canadian ones still up and running:
http://www.hackcanada.com/hackcanada/oldsite/bbs/index.html

I'm going way too far with this but we also have packet switching networks still being used a lot. Datapac in Canada is one of them. There's an article about it in here:
 http://www.nettwerked.net/K-1ine_50.txt