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Immortal since Feb 21, 2011
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I slay sacred cows in my dreams. I cherish truth above all else. Peace Rebel
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    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    From Phyllotaxis's personal cargo

    Looking past Einstein. (with his role intact): (EC pt. 2)
    "After nearly 100 years, Einstein’s theories have not been unified. They are not falsifiable. These two facts alone merit reconsidering their continued use. The lack of unification and lack of fundamental ties to reality demands explanation. The LCDM model of the universe has no less than 5 adjustable parameters that can arbitrarily be adjusted to account for observation. This is no different than Ptolemy’s epicycles that were continually adjusted to account for observation without providing any real explanation of the mechanics behind what is being observed.

    "At this point it is almost impossible for even a professional cosmologist to name all of the hypothetical entities required by Einstein’s theories. Occam’s Razor demands we follow the theory with the least amount of unnecessary entities. While the standard model may be able to formulate responses to the problems presented, it seems that electric cosmology offers a solution to all of the problems by simply adding ONE postulate to the universe – that current flows in space plasmas. Given the utter simplicity of this postulate and the overwhelming evidence in support of it, Occam’s Razor demands it be given full attention.

    "Modern cosmology is engaging in what can broadly be categorized as scientific fraud. Nearly every explanation of astrophysical phenomena involves the use of frozen-in fields, an impossibility in any real plasma. Nearly every explanation involves the use of some totally unproven, unfounded, and baseless hypothetical form of matter or energy, be it dark energy, dark matter, or fictional black holes that blatantly violate Einsteinian relativity. Every attempt to prove the existence of these hypothetical entities has resulted in failure.

    "Because a steady state universe, as postulated by Lorentz, does not require unification and complies with Maxwell’s equations (which themselves assume an infinite universe and universal speed), this also resolves the long standing problem of unifying Einstein’s theories.

    "And finally, a large collection of papers in support of the arguments made."


    This is where to read it:
     http://knol.google.com/k/einstein-was-wrong-falsifying-observational-evidence-presented 
    ___-___



    Source: http://thunderbolts.info/tpod/2011/arch11/110707plasmoids.htm 

    These claims must be examined, for their impact when understood has far-reaching co-truths about the fundamental nature of what this life experience...is.
    We have to demand modern science prove its claims. Nothing more. Explain how some answers are better than others to the people that are trying to figure it out for themselves, and need to be convinced.
    It is a task quickly and eagerly answered by the fact-friendly camp.
    All of this comes down to a few crystal-clear points: every scientific theory must explain or refute through proof of testing, and record of observation.
    If it turns out one day that people look back on the recent (in historical terms) abstract and malleable interpretation of the universe as a habit overcome, the full scope, majesty, and content of our universe will expand in all directions, and the potential of mankind will accelerate beyond our dreams. Star Trek and interstellar exploration will carry man into a highness we can scarcely comprehend- but one day we will be capable, in principle, to continue to refine knowledge and its applications to our surroundings. We have to sift, repeatedly, through new ideas, and new interpretations. You might anticipate that future as life-extending technology. Another might dream of the cultural understanding of an intimacy yet unconcieved. It may be the possible connection with another impossibly rare occurance: life born and evolved in another speck of our vast universe. Whatever it is, it must see science as a tool to be used to answer those questions. When it ceases being a tool of purpose and becomes an object of art, the reasons for thinking about it become unmoored, and its use to them decouples.

    No matter your vision, we must be impartial and passionate. Those symbiotic traits must exist together, or we are wasting the minuscule slice of the time and exposure we have...in our one life. This science is real, and we must address it. We must stop ignoring the voluminous evidence any longer.

    We must do it right in the tiny moment we have in this place. Who are we robbing the future of, besides ourselves? The discoveries and their adoptance will come. But when?
    Einstein himself is repeatedly documented as having rejected much of what has since been tacked to his name by mathematic puzzle-makers.

    I, as one, want to see how far this life...my generation... can make it while you and I are here breathing.

    I see exciting arguments and great opportunity here for fitting the pieces together at last.

    Mon, Aug 1, 2011  Permanent link

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