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Comment on Free will as nonlinear transformational effectiveness

Wildcat Sun, Mar 21, 2010
Excellent post Alex, thanks for that. I agree. however allow me to point a few issues which I see as fundamental:
firstly I think (and I said so before , about a yr ago in another comm. we have had) that free and will are two incompatible statements, we cannot and should not accept these two words put together under one canopy for these designate two completely different realities ( and maybe multidimensionality indeed is the only way out of this linguistic conundrum). from a different perspective of course the concept of free will is a highly usable tool 'at present' in the manner that our common society operates (legal systems and so on), and indeed I do not see a reason or a motive why we will need this fictitious entity called free will (outside the common at present necessity) in our own internal doings.
it goes without saying that all of our designated systems are arbitrarily defined and thus all distinctions made within said designations are consequences of each other and create a concatenated loop of self description which both reinforces itself and defeats the origination of ontology. In fact it may very well be that there is no ontology to 'free will' and why indeed would there be?
of what inherency does it partake and what reasoning does it serve?
neurologically the point is moot as has been proven by Libet et Al. philosophically the point is moot as has been proven by Deleuze.
the question of free won't (our neuroability to veto certain kinds of operational behaviors) is only slightly more interesting.
I would venture the idea that we do NOT need this concept altogether and maybe by getting rid of a superfluous concept we can finally allow the interplay of forces both exerted and exerting to 'freely' flow in the evolutionary game play in which we coexist and upon which we co-depend.
notwithstanding all of the above I think we can both accept and reject the notion of 'free will' simultaneously - not a logical move of course, but one which deeply resonates.