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Aimee Smith (F)
Los Angeles, US
Immortal since Apr 16, 2007
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    Eco Club
    Worm in Rotterdam is a night club built from 80-90% recycled materials. I love the Dutch.

    Rico Gagliano's NPR interview with Worm's CFO, Mike Van Gaasbeek:
    The club's toilets are made of old oil barrels. The door handles are re-used bike handlebars. Even the ventilation pipes were salvaged from a demolished office building. The club's walls are made of recycled real estate signs. Van Gaasbeek refers the materials used to build Worm as "upcycled, because it's having a better life. It was in a dull office building, and now it's in a cool club."



    Mike Van Gaasbeek spent 300 euro per square meter building the space. "Normally you spend 1,500 euros a square meter. But the idea wasn't just to save money. Worm is Rotterdam's most vivid example of an idea called "sustainable clubbing" — night spots minimizing waste and energy use."

    Michel Smit works for a startup company called De Sustainable Dance Club; "An average club uses 150 times the energy that a normal family of three people uses a year. If you look at water, it's 170 times. If you add those things up, there's a lot to gain in clubbing."
    Michel's goal: to open a Rotterdam club that uses every energy-saving resource available, including the clubgoers themselves. "Certain materials produce electricity when squeezed. So a dance floor can become one big generator. We've called it "harvest your energy." With the electricity-generating dance floor, we're trying to use that power that you've got to power the lights."


    Fri, Jul 6, 2007  Permanent link

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    elenakulikova     Fri, Dec 28, 2007  Permanent link
    lovely to find your post .. I've been to this place to do a magazine story on it with photographer Menno Kok .. I was also blown away by the design, not just for asthetic reasons, but because everything there was designed from recycled materials .. a few days later I researched and contacted the designers which made the "couch" in your picture below .. they were such amazing people .. Denis Oudendijk & Jan Korbes
    +www.complett.nl Their studio is located in the Hague creating "garbage architecture", mostly from tires, not only in Holland but world wide ...
    please stay tuned for a creative collaboration between them and me! ... coming up in the next months ... I'm really excited to post the result on SC soon ;-) ... it will be beautiful ..
    cupcakewizard     Fri, Dec 28, 2007  Permanent link
    Hey Elena! It's amazing that someone came up with the concept but then actually executed it! Have you had the pleasure of dancing on the human generator dancefloor there? I'm really looking forward to your collaberation with these gents. I've already seen your creativity at work- very inspiring. The 'garbage architecture' reminds me of megan's dig for fashion in the trash.
     
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