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Design Media Arts at UCLA
Henry Scott Debey (M)
planet earth, US
Immortal since Mar 29, 2007
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  • henrys’ project
    Design Media Arts at UCLA
    In the 1970s space colonies were considered to be a viable alternative to a life restricted to planet Earth. The design of cylindrical space...
    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    From henrys's personal cargo

    REGENERATION
    Project: Design Media Arts at UCLA
    Oakland Bridge Collapse



    The portion of one of Oakland's bridges that recently collapsed is an example of a system failure (although perhaps rare) due to lack of redundancy and automatically generated reinforcement. As a result of the fire that took place on this bridge from an oil truck crash, many motorists will have to find alternate routes from this freeway until the bridge is repaired - causing significant added congestion to the highways of the Bay Area.


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    Cell Regeneration in an Artery



    Nature's response to failed sytems is cell regeneration and reproduction. Our bodies and many other organisms in nature automatically fill voids or replace structural elements that once were. This can be seen as platelet formation on a superficial wound that bleeds but eventually stops.


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    Beehive - A Redundant System



    Nature's formidable examples of regeneration and redundancy in systems through combinations of networks and independent entities is visible to us in many instances.
    The versatility of being able to re-create what once was and re-generate what was destroyed is an edge that is lost in most of today's design and architecture - the insistance on redundancy on and for system's to resprout, regrow and fix themselves, leaving no trace of the trauma that perhaps was once imposed.


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    Designing with Regeneration in Mind





    This project will involve exhibiting these essential and intelligent properties of nature. Through tactile and sensory experiences, users will have the opportunity to create voids and observe the regeneration of elements ("cells") into the space that they have created. The project will only be defined in these terms and will not bear identical resemblance to cell regeneration. The constricting of soap bubbles will provide a template for the visual - as seen with the hexagonal shapes above. The reason for this being that consolidated spheres result in these hexagonal shapes that represent efficient design in the sense that it uses the least amount of surface area while providing a maximum volume. The Installation of the piece could take on many forms but will consist of a vertical canvas that incorporates sensors to detect the presence of other organisms and either an electronic output through LEDs or motors.


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    LED DISPLAY



    This display will be compromised of LEDs generating rythmic patterns through brightness and color. The regenerative element will be seen as one LED lights up and slowly gets brighter will the others immediately surrounding it follow suit.


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    REGROWTH - RESPROUT - REGENERATE



    As users activate the sensors for this project the multiple holes in the board will begin to feed out morcels or potentially cords - these can be ripped off by the viewer, the organism will regenerate and unreel additional cord to replace the void.


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    LYCRA/ LATEX SCREEN



    A more tactile approach compared to the others - this display will consist of two lycra or latex screens sandwiching an automatically evolving sphere growth. The viewers can push depression into the material and alter or create voids that will be replaced by the organism.


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    ROTATIONAL APPROACH



    A slightly more mechanical approach this board will exhibit rotating cylinders of varying size that will raise and lower and taught screen of lycra or latex.


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    PROJECTION APPROACH



    Through the use of rear projection this display will feature previously programmed images of sphere regeneration through the use of processing - a sensor will also be utilized to trip the program and allow it to restart.



    Mon, May 7, 2007  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Design Media Arts at UCLA
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