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Immortal since Apr 23, 2010
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Emergent day to you. 2010-04-22 is my knowmad birthday. Think I understood the word. More to emerge.
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    Polytopia
    The human species is rapidly and indisputably moving towards the technological singularity. The cadence of the flow of information and innovation in...

    The Total Library
    Text that redefines...
    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    Gunther Sonnenfeld:
    "The realities of knowledge acquisition, distribution and retention are very different in a world in which the past, present and future are constantly being rewritten. Look no further than the Internet and the social web for overwhelming evidence of the shifts in how we acquire, distribute and retain information, or what we construe as knowledge."

    ...

    "What if we could all accept the precept that what we actually know is dwarfed by what we don’t know, and that’s actually a good thing?

    To build from the example of an Internet economy, we are conductors of information that shifts the idea of control away from what’s ‘ownable’ and towards a dynamic of shared distribution and responsibility. To take it further, the idea isn’t necessarily to stake claim to a domain, but to unpack it such that the next best inferences and outcomes can occur.

    As the graphic above implies, there are some interesting alignments — human attributes, to be more specific — with all that we don’t know.

    While what you know is considered knowledge, what you don’t know is or can be a heightened form of awareness. It’s analogous to knowing what not to do. It’s the kind of foundational learning that enables us to make better choices and create better options for ourselves.

    What you think you know or what you might know, take on forms of reason, imagination, and sometimes, outright delusion. In the same way we might intuit a scenario or imagine an outcome, we can also delude ourselves into thinking that a present reality doesn’t exist (such as a failing business). Whether it does or doesn’t is also tied to the awareness of why what we might know actually matters.

    What you want to know and what you don’t know that you don’t know (the unknown unknowns) take on forms of curiosity and discovery. Wanting, doing and seeing or understanding become critical factors in shaping a new reality around what we don’t know. As such, we become wiser as we learn about what we didn’t know before, or what we still might not know going forward.

    Seem obvious? It probably isn’t, considering how often we repeat the same mistakes based on what we think we know."
    ...

    Experience The Power of Not Knowing
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    Systems thinking is relevant to all professions and academic disciplines that deal with life in one way or another—with living organisms, social systems, or ecosystems. Systems thinking is inherently multidisciplinary and I hope our textbook will help to create a common language for students of all disciplines.

    The language of systems thinking came out of that crisis scientists confronted in the 1920s. Ever since Descartes, they had been searching for the smallest particle—from organisms to cells to molecules to quarks. But when they thought they had found the fundamental constituents of matter, they suddenly realized there are no fundamental constituents. It is all a web of connections and interrelations.

    Systems thinking thus helps us to understand how all the problems we confront are interconnected. There are no isolated solutions. We need interconnected solutions. The problem of energy cannot be solved by finding cheaper sources of energy. If we had hydrogen fusion right now, or some new energy source that was cheap and safe, all our other problems would only get worse. If you fuel a system that is out of balance, you just have the same system but on steroids. We would damage the rainforests, deplete the ecosphere, pollute the air, and increase health problems. In other words, the energy problem is also a health problem and a food problem and a water problem, and it needs to be addressed as such.


    The question Marjorie Kelly asked Fritjof Capra was:

    "Your new book, The Systems View of Life, provides an overview of systems thinking for those in a broad range of professions, from economics and politics to medicine, psychology, and law. Why do you see systems thinking as valuable in so many different setting"


    - See more at: http://greattransition.org/publication/systems-thinking-and-system-change
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    "Circular reasoning is bad mostly because it’s not very good."

    http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/begging-the-question

    Here a whole large cc-licensed poster by @jesserichardson and @somethingfornow.


    While on the topic of logical fallacies, here are their mental bedfellows, cognitive biases. You can download a PDF of the groupings of biases that occur most frequently in business. Courtesy of McKinsey & Co. https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/files/article/PDF/BiasSpread.pdf
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    ... our children can only do as bad as we are doing, and this is the challenge we are facing - we have to go beyond it. — Gunter Pauli

    Click image for video

    Quoting more for context

    Forget about the fact that while we were doing in the past the right way is going to bring us to the future.
    It is not
    and this is one of the biggest lessons we have
    as parents, we want our kids to be better
    and here is a picture of my little baby
    and my two sons
    we always want it to be better but that means that we have to create the space of our children
    can invent, develop new pathways to the future
    Because if we are only teaching what we know
    our children can only do as bad as we are doing
    and this is the challenge we are facing
    we have to go beyond it.

    ...

    My quest today is to see how can we design a new competitive model
    a business model based on sustainability whereby we define sustainability
    as the capacity to respond to the needs of all with what we have
    and that's the way natural systems do it all the time
    the past twenty years we've been doing things…
    that we thought were the normal way to do it
    but it was an economy that was based on what we did not have
    and so what do we have?
    well, first of all we have a lot of needs
    and since there are so many unmet needs for water, for food, for healthcare, for housing
    there is a growing demand, even at a time of a recession
    and we have the science to develop it
    so much of the science is available
    and we don't use it, it gets buried
    so how do we achieve a sustainable society?
    we achieve a sustainable society when first of all, we think positive
    that's what this conference is all about
    think positive
    second, learn creatively
    and third, if any one of you thinks this meeting is a success
    it is because when you go out of this meeting you do something
    too many meetings are talk shops
    too much talking, no action
    dream it, don't do it
    that's unfortunately what we hear too often
    so my work today, is very much focusing on doing all of this at once

    ...

    More from Gunter Pauli's TEDxTokyo talk, with full transcript on http://dotsub.com
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    Jeff Jonas wrote in General Purpose Sensemaking Systems and Information Colocation

    ... With information trapped in the tailored database schemas of systems of record, operational data stores, data warehouses and data marts, it is no wonder organizations continue to struggle to make sense of it all – despite decades of effort and innovation.

    Performing some kind of federated search over all these disparate data sets just has not ever delivered. In fact, federated search bites when it comes to sensemaking because the diverse data structures are incapable of supporting a sensemaking function.

    If you want to be smart, you will want to jam the available, diverse, observational space into the same data structure and in as close to the same physical space as possible.

    Data is data.

    When reference data, transactional data, and even user queries are colocated in the same data structures and is the same indexes as the extracted features from text, video, biometrics, and so on … something very exciting happens: data naturally finds data and context can accumulate.

    ...

    Long story short, when this general sensemaking system came on-line it started finding marketing hosts comping their roommates and lots of other unanticipated novel discovery. So much novel discovery, it earned the name Non-Obvious Relationship Awareness or NORA, we got two rounds of funding, IBM bought my company to get its hands on the technology, and the rest is history.

    Simply said, you have to have a brain (multi-purpose, general structure) to think (sense make). Then with a brain, the smartest you are going to be is a function of what observations you have properly contextualized into that meat space between your ears.



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    Why No Straight Lines

    By Alan Moore

    We are now living in what many people now call the Networked Society, where we are creating, collaborating, in ways that defy the logic of our industrial era.


    Video 2:33

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    Kevin Kelly, author, Out of Control

    Chapter 2: HIVE MIND - The collective intelligence of a mob

    In a darkened Las Vegas conference room, a cheering audience waves cardboard wands in the air. Each wand is red on one side, green on the other. Far in back of the huge auditorium, a camera scans the frantic attendees. The video camera links the color spots of the wands to a nest of computers set up by graphics wizard Loren Carpenter. Carpenter's custom software locates each red and each green wand in the auditorium. Tonight there are just shy of 5,000 wandwavers. The computer displays the precise location of each wand (and its color) onto an immense, detailed video map of the auditorium hung on the front stage, which all can see. More importantly, the computer counts the total red or green wands and uses that value to control software. As the audience wave the wands, the display screen shows a sea of lights dancing crazily in the dark, like a candlelight parade gone punk. The viewers see themselves on the map; they are either a red or green pixel. By flipping their own wands, they can change the color of their projected pixels instantly.

    Loren Carpenter boots up the ancient video game of Pong onto the immense screen. Pong was the first commercial video game to reach pop consciousness. It's a minimalist arrangement: a white dot bounces inside a square; two movable rectangles on each side act as virtual paddles. In short, electronic ping-pong. In this version, displaying the red side of your wand moves the paddle up. Green moves it down. More precisely, the Pong paddle moves as the average number of red wands in the auditorium increases or decreases. Your wand is just one vote.

    Carpenter doesn't need to explain very much. Every attendee at this 1991 conference of computer graphic experts was probably once hooked on Pong. His amplified voice booms in the hall, "Okay guys. Folks on the left side of the auditorium control the left paddle. Folks on the right side control the right paddle. If you think you are on the left, then you really are. Okay? Go!"

    The audience roars in delight. Without a moment's hesitation, 5,000 people are playing a reasonably good game of Pong. Each move of the paddle is the average of several thousand players' intentions. The sensation is unnerving. The paddle usually does what you intend, but not always. When it doesn't, you find yourself spending as much attention trying to anticipate the paddle as the incoming ball. One is definitely aware of another intelligence online: it's this hollering mob.

    The group mind plays Pong so well that Carpenter decides to up the ante. Without warning the ball bounces faster. The participants squeal in unison. In a second or two, the mob has adjusted to the quicker pace and is playing better than before. Carpenter speeds up the game further; the mob learns instantly.

    "Let's try something else," Carpenter suggests. A map of seats in the auditorium appears on the screen. He draws a wide circle in white around the center. "Can you make a green '5' in the circle?" he asks the audience. The audience stares at the rows of red pixels. The game is similar to that of holding a placard up in a stadium to make a picture, but now there are no preset orders, just a virtual mirror. Almost immediately wiggles of green pixels appear and grow haphazardly, as those who think their seat is in the path of the "5" flip their wands to green. A vague figure is materializing. The audience collectively begins to discern a "5" in the noise. Once discerned, the "5" quickly precipitates out into stark clarity. The wand-wavers on the fuzzy edge of the figure decide what side they "should" be on, and the emerging "5" sharpens up. The number assembles itself.

    "Now make a four!" the voice booms. Within moments a "4" emerges. "Three." And in a blink a "3" appears. Then in rapid succession, "Two... One...Zero." The emergent thing is on a roll.


    Source: Kevin Kelly, Out of Control, Chapter 2: HIVE MIND - The collective intelligence of a mob

    Photo by Joi Ito

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