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Emergent day to you. 2010-04-22 is my knowmad birthday. Think I understood the word. More to emerge.
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    The human species is rapidly and indisputably moving towards the technological singularity. The cadence of the flow of information and innovation in...

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    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.


    Why artificial intelligence research has been working on the wrong problem. Slow down to learn from Monica Anderson.

    My talk at Stanford University on May 17, 2014 at the Advancing Humanity Symposium – organized by Stanford Transhumanist Association.
    I discuss Dual Process Theory, The Frame Problem, and some consequences of these for AI research.
    Dual Process Theory is the idea that the human mind has two disparate modes of thinking - Subconscious Intuitive Understanding on one hand and Conscious Logical Reasoning on the other.
    The Frame Problem is the idea that we cannot make comprehensive Models of the World because the world changes behind our backs and any Model we make is immediately obsolete.
    The conclusion is that AI research since the 1950s has been solving the wrong problem.
    I discuss Model Free Methods as an alternative path to AI, capable of sidestepping the Frame Problem.



    https://vimeo.com/111967600
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    Gunther Sonnenfeld:
    "The realities of knowledge acquisition, distribution and retention are very different in a world in which the past, present and future are constantly being rewritten. Look no further than the Internet and the social web for overwhelming evidence of the shifts in how we acquire, distribute and retain information, or what we construe as knowledge."

    ...

    "What if we could all accept the precept that what we actually know is dwarfed by what we don’t know, and that’s actually a good thing?

    To build from the example of an Internet economy, we are conductors of information that shifts the idea of control away from what’s ‘ownable’ and towards a dynamic of shared distribution and responsibility. To take it further, the idea isn’t necessarily to stake claim to a domain, but to unpack it such that the next best inferences and outcomes can occur.

    As the graphic above implies, there are some interesting alignments — human attributes, to be more specific — with all that we don’t know.

    While what you know is considered knowledge, what you don’t know is or can be a heightened form of awareness. It’s analogous to knowing what not to do. It’s the kind of foundational learning that enables us to make better choices and create better options for ourselves.

    What you think you know or what you might know, take on forms of reason, imagination, and sometimes, outright delusion. In the same way we might intuit a scenario or imagine an outcome, we can also delude ourselves into thinking that a present reality doesn’t exist (such as a failing business). Whether it does or doesn’t is also tied to the awareness of why what we might know actually matters.

    What you want to know and what you don’t know that you don’t know (the unknown unknowns) take on forms of curiosity and discovery. Wanting, doing and seeing or understanding become critical factors in shaping a new reality around what we don’t know. As such, we become wiser as we learn about what we didn’t know before, or what we still might not know going forward.

    Seem obvious? It probably isn’t, considering how often we repeat the same mistakes based on what we think we know."
    ...

    Experience The Power of Not Knowing
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    Meet Gangaji, who speaks about silence and space and writes in Hidden Treasure:

    Naturally we have been thrilled to realize that we can choose to live a different story, one we feel more in alignment with. There is yet another choice. We have the capacity to take a moment and release all stories. We can experience what it means to be nobody, uncovered even by our primary identity.

    Underneath all the stories, we can experience that deep core of ourselves that is historyless, genderless, and parentless. Naked. That presence is unencumbered by relationships and has no past and no future. In the core of our beingness we are free of definitions. Unencumbered by our definitions we experience ourselves as conscious intelligence aware of itself as open, endless space. This instant of being storyless is an instant of freedom. For even if our story is filled with light and beauty, to the degree that we define ourselves through that story, we are less free.

    After such a moment, stories are never the same. They can be present, as they most likely will be, but they no longer have the inherent power to define our reality.




    Enjoy the invitation to become conscious of what is always here, while Gangaji teaches us nothing, in 8 minutes video of Satsang, (Sanskrit सत्सङ्ग sat = true, sanga = company), a call to the collective space of refuge, this heart of space.
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    Why No Straight Lines

    By Alan Moore

    We are now living in what many people now call the Networked Society, where we are creating, collaborating, in ways that defy the logic of our industrial era.


    Video 2:33

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    The source of the term Journal for the Traction TeamPage database is Douglas Engelbart's NLS system (later renamed Augment), which Doug developed in the 1960's as one of the first hypertext systems. Traction's time ordered database, entry + item ID addressing, and many Traction concepts were directly inspired by Doug's work. I'd also claim that Doug's Journal is the first blog - dating from 1969.

    More importantly, Doug's focus has never been "content management" or some buzzword - it's been improving the performance of teams dealing with complex and challenging tasks - "raising their collective IQ". Augmenting human intelligence is a challenging and noble goal for social software.

    In the late 1960's Doug created the Journal (along with the mouse, shared-screen interactive hypertext and video, dynamic outlining and many other inventions) to support the needs of high performance, problem solving teams.

    Doug’s first hypertext Journaling systems were deployed as part of the original ARPANet Network Information Center (NIC), starting with ARPANet Node 3 at SRI - i.e. the third node on what we know as the Internet.
    ...

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    Kevin Kelly, author, Out of Control

    Chapter 2: HIVE MIND - The collective intelligence of a mob

    In a darkened Las Vegas conference room, a cheering audience waves cardboard wands in the air. Each wand is red on one side, green on the other. Far in back of the huge auditorium, a camera scans the frantic attendees. The video camera links the color spots of the wands to a nest of computers set up by graphics wizard Loren Carpenter. Carpenter's custom software locates each red and each green wand in the auditorium. Tonight there are just shy of 5,000 wandwavers. The computer displays the precise location of each wand (and its color) onto an immense, detailed video map of the auditorium hung on the front stage, which all can see. More importantly, the computer counts the total red or green wands and uses that value to control software. As the audience wave the wands, the display screen shows a sea of lights dancing crazily in the dark, like a candlelight parade gone punk. The viewers see themselves on the map; they are either a red or green pixel. By flipping their own wands, they can change the color of their projected pixels instantly.

    Loren Carpenter boots up the ancient video game of Pong onto the immense screen. Pong was the first commercial video game to reach pop consciousness. It's a minimalist arrangement: a white dot bounces inside a square; two movable rectangles on each side act as virtual paddles. In short, electronic ping-pong. In this version, displaying the red side of your wand moves the paddle up. Green moves it down. More precisely, the Pong paddle moves as the average number of red wands in the auditorium increases or decreases. Your wand is just one vote.

    Carpenter doesn't need to explain very much. Every attendee at this 1991 conference of computer graphic experts was probably once hooked on Pong. His amplified voice booms in the hall, "Okay guys. Folks on the left side of the auditorium control the left paddle. Folks on the right side control the right paddle. If you think you are on the left, then you really are. Okay? Go!"

    The audience roars in delight. Without a moment's hesitation, 5,000 people are playing a reasonably good game of Pong. Each move of the paddle is the average of several thousand players' intentions. The sensation is unnerving. The paddle usually does what you intend, but not always. When it doesn't, you find yourself spending as much attention trying to anticipate the paddle as the incoming ball. One is definitely aware of another intelligence online: it's this hollering mob.

    The group mind plays Pong so well that Carpenter decides to up the ante. Without warning the ball bounces faster. The participants squeal in unison. In a second or two, the mob has adjusted to the quicker pace and is playing better than before. Carpenter speeds up the game further; the mob learns instantly.

    "Let's try something else," Carpenter suggests. A map of seats in the auditorium appears on the screen. He draws a wide circle in white around the center. "Can you make a green '5' in the circle?" he asks the audience. The audience stares at the rows of red pixels. The game is similar to that of holding a placard up in a stadium to make a picture, but now there are no preset orders, just a virtual mirror. Almost immediately wiggles of green pixels appear and grow haphazardly, as those who think their seat is in the path of the "5" flip their wands to green. A vague figure is materializing. The audience collectively begins to discern a "5" in the noise. Once discerned, the "5" quickly precipitates out into stark clarity. The wand-wavers on the fuzzy edge of the figure decide what side they "should" be on, and the emerging "5" sharpens up. The number assembles itself.

    "Now make a four!" the voice booms. Within moments a "4" emerges. "Three." And in a blink a "3" appears. Then in rapid succession, "Two... One...Zero." The emergent thing is on a roll.


    Source: Kevin Kelly, Out of Control, Chapter 2: HIVE MIND - The collective intelligence of a mob

    Photo by Joi Ito

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