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Emergent day to you. 2010-04-22 is my knowmad birthday. Think I understood the word. More to emerge.
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    The human species is rapidly and indisputably moving towards the technological singularity. The cadence of the flow of information and innovation in...

    The Total Library
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    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    One of my paid hobbies has been innovation for the company, as in making new technology work for us to help us complete our jobs for clients, easier, faster or more reliable. More than a year ago, one of my responsibilities shifted from process innovation to business development. Loving it.

    In my free time, took basic courses in project management, both waterfall and agile, read business books like Tribal Leadership and The Culture Game, all good and valuable, but none of these prompted me to post to Space Collective.

    The framework for directed innovation does. It is old enough to be proven in business and criticized in public, yet new enough (to me, anyway) to get excited about innovation insights. (You too, maybe?)

    Let's begin with quoting from one of many insightful articles from the company Strategyn, whose logo I borrowed for the image, The New Language of Innovation


    [image goes here if upload works again]


    The Language of Innovation

    Innovation

    Since people buy products and services to get a job done, innovation is defined as the process of devising a product or service concept that helps customers get a job or jobs done better. The innovation process begins with market selection and ends with a product or service concept that is approved for development. Ideally, only winning product concepts enter the development process. To be approved for development, a winning concept must also meet company success and societal criteria.

    Idea-first Approach to Innovation

    An inherently flawed approach to innovation that starts with the generation of ideas and is followed by evaluation and filtering methods that determine which ideas customers like best without ever explicitly understanding all their needs. Although this approach is popular, the chances of coming up with an idea that precisely addresses all the unmet needs of target customers is near zero. This approach is analogous to a sharpshooter trying to hit a target without knowing what the target is or a doctor prescribing a treatment without observing patient symptoms. It is a time-consuming and costly approach that may never produce a winning concept. Because it is nothing more than guesswork, it will always result in low success rates.

    Needs-first Approach to Innovation

    An approach to innovation in which companies first uncover all the customer’s needs, then determine which are unmet, and then devise solutions to address those unmet needs. Historically, the needs-first approach to innovation has been ineffective, but the approach is not inherently flawed. The approach has been ineffective because in most companies there is no agreement on what a need is, and few companies believe all the customer’s needs can be captured. They have been told for years that customers can’t articulate their needs and that customers have latent needs, neither of which is true. (See “customer need”.)

    Outcome-Driven Innovation (ODI)

    Outcome-Driven Innovation is an innovation process invented by Strategyn in 1991 that has been tested and refined for over 20 years. It is an effective needs-first approach to innovation that has an 86 percent success rate.


    That's a bold promise, and reading through their published examples, I believe this approach can deliver in many corporate cultures. The Innovation and Strategy Blog quotes Tony Ulwick, author of what customers want and Strategyn CEO, saying,"Failing fast and pivoting are not an innovation strategy"

    Looking forward to learn more.

    Full disclosure: I hold no stake in this company and am not a client, nor affiliated to officers of theirs.
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    In debt
    Project: Polytopia


    12-year old Victoria Grant explains why her homeland, Canada, and most of the world, is in debt. April 27, 2012 at the Public Banking in America Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

    Victoria Grant from Marc Armstrong on Vimeo.



    For more information see http://www.publicbankinginstitute.org or http://www.moveourmoney.net

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    Jon Rappoport writes:

    I rerun this Starfield article every so often, just to push the wheel another turn. Each time I try to write a new introduction. Here is one.

    After working as a reporter for 30 years, I've come to understand a few things about public reaction to the truth. People like to say they're enlightened. They like to say they've seen through the major propaganda operations that are launched and are spinning all around us. But when you bulldoze a hole in a part of the Matrix where certain subjects are engraved on stone pillars, and when those subjects are firmly entrenched in the public mind as foundations of Reality, the usual response is silent shock.

    Even when people are able to accept the truth, they tend toward silence. They don't pass the truth on.

    Retired propaganda master, Ellis Medavoy, whom I interview in THE MATRIX REVEALED, once explained it to me this way:

    "You've taken them out of a state of hypnosis, a state of trance, but the truth you're giving them puts them in another trance. In that part of their mind where they've been asleep for so long, they're used to that narcosis. So even though they see truth now, they respond with new sleep. It's not really an awakening at all. It's as if they've walked out of one war zone into another, dazed."

    Ellis describes perfectly what happens to many people when they see the truth of medical murder in the US. It particularly happens because there is no logical way to understand it, given the expectations people have about what murder is, what murder means.

    And there's another problem. As you'll see, the figures on medically caused death in America I'm citing come from an author with absolutely impeccable mainstream credentials. The review she wrote was published in one of the most prestigious medical journals in the world. It was all "on the up and up."

    That's precisely why I use her figures, rather than those compiled by outsiders, who, by the way, probably have better numbers that are even more chilling.

    I've had people stare blankly at me after a discussion of the interview below and say, outright, "This is impossible. It can't be true. You see, if a really respected doctor is making these claims, and if her review is published in a prestigious journal, then mainstream doctors and medical schools and government would have to react. They would have to clean house."

    But they don't.

    And that is called a clue. We are talking about something similar to the experience of the German people during the rise of Hitler. They went along. They told themselves stories to make it all right. They used the familiar tricks of denial.

    This is what makes the Matrix the Matrix.

    more...

    Image source not related to quoted article, except by posting here.
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    ... our children can only do as bad as we are doing, and this is the challenge we are facing - we have to go beyond it. — Gunter Pauli

    Click image for video

    Quoting more for context

    Forget about the fact that while we were doing in the past the right way is going to bring us to the future.
    It is not
    and this is one of the biggest lessons we have
    as parents, we want our kids to be better
    and here is a picture of my little baby
    and my two sons
    we always want it to be better but that means that we have to create the space of our children
    can invent, develop new pathways to the future
    Because if we are only teaching what we know
    our children can only do as bad as we are doing
    and this is the challenge we are facing
    we have to go beyond it.

    ...

    My quest today is to see how can we design a new competitive model
    a business model based on sustainability whereby we define sustainability
    as the capacity to respond to the needs of all with what we have
    and that's the way natural systems do it all the time
    the past twenty years we've been doing things…
    that we thought were the normal way to do it
    but it was an economy that was based on what we did not have
    and so what do we have?
    well, first of all we have a lot of needs
    and since there are so many unmet needs for water, for food, for healthcare, for housing
    there is a growing demand, even at a time of a recession
    and we have the science to develop it
    so much of the science is available
    and we don't use it, it gets buried
    so how do we achieve a sustainable society?
    we achieve a sustainable society when first of all, we think positive
    that's what this conference is all about
    think positive
    second, learn creatively
    and third, if any one of you thinks this meeting is a success
    it is because when you go out of this meeting you do something
    too many meetings are talk shops
    too much talking, no action
    dream it, don't do it
    that's unfortunately what we hear too often
    so my work today, is very much focusing on doing all of this at once

    ...

    More from Gunter Pauli's TEDxTokyo talk, with full transcript on http://dotsub.com
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    Jeff Jonas wrote in General Purpose Sensemaking Systems and Information Colocation

    ... With information trapped in the tailored database schemas of systems of record, operational data stores, data warehouses and data marts, it is no wonder organizations continue to struggle to make sense of it all – despite decades of effort and innovation.

    Performing some kind of federated search over all these disparate data sets just has not ever delivered. In fact, federated search bites when it comes to sensemaking because the diverse data structures are incapable of supporting a sensemaking function.

    If you want to be smart, you will want to jam the available, diverse, observational space into the same data structure and in as close to the same physical space as possible.

    Data is data.

    When reference data, transactional data, and even user queries are colocated in the same data structures and is the same indexes as the extracted features from text, video, biometrics, and so on … something very exciting happens: data naturally finds data and context can accumulate.

    ...

    Long story short, when this general sensemaking system came on-line it started finding marketing hosts comping their roommates and lots of other unanticipated novel discovery. So much novel discovery, it earned the name Non-Obvious Relationship Awareness or NORA, we got two rounds of funding, IBM bought my company to get its hands on the technology, and the rest is history.

    Simply said, you have to have a brain (multi-purpose, general structure) to think (sense make). Then with a brain, the smartest you are going to be is a function of what observations you have properly contextualized into that meat space between your ears.



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    Wave Riders are curious people possessed of an innate capacity to go with the flow, constantly seizing upon opportunity when others see no possibility, or even disaster. Their level of performance is consistently high, and projects are often completed in breathtakingly short periods of time, with a degree of excellence that may seem unbelievable. Not always, not in every instance – but with a regularity that sets them apart, but never alone. Together with their fellows, Wave Riders create the critical community bonds, essential for productive activity. And they bring a special gift – Leadership. Their passion and responsibility for a cause inspires others to make common cause. Not by domination and control, but through invitation and appreciation, the efforts of many coalesce as one.


    More, in the words of Harrison Owen:

    Saying that Wave Riders go with the flow is not to say that they have a light regard for planning, logic, and hard work. In fact the Wave Rider may be a fanatic for planning, logical to a fault, and a total workaholic. But what sets them apart is that they also possess a clear understanding of the limitations of all three: planning, logic, and hard work. For them the Plan is the map and not the territory. Necessary, useful, but never to be confused with the facts on the ground, and certainly never to be given preeminence.

    Likewise with logic. Good and useful for sure, but when the daily course of experience appears to behave in an illogical fashion, usually referred to as counter-intuitive, the Wave Rider will understand that there are multiple "logics" and it may well be that the one employed is simply inappropriate to the situation. A classic case of this phenomenon comes from the world of Physics at the point where Quantum Mechanics made its appearance. Traditional Newtonian physicists were logical past all, perceiving the elegant coherence in the cosmos to be an exquisite clockworks. However, as the world of subatomic physics became the object of study, the traditional logic faltered. And those who were crafting the emerging quantum physics used the sense of illogic to advance their work. Walter Heisenberg, the originator of the Uncertainty Principle, is said to have remarked, " Your Theory is crazy, but not crazy enough to be true."

    On the subject of work – Wave Riders do indeed work very hard. They are often sticklers for detail and devote amazing amounts of time and energy to enterprises for which they have a genuine passion. When they care, they care deeply, and the effect of this caring is a devotion to their cause that others may find disturbing.

    But there is another aspect to a Wave Rider’s relation to work that many will find strange. On occasion, all of their busy doing simply stops. The task lists are put away, the goals and objectives are all placed on hold. The Wave Rider is content to be there in that present moment. An outside observer might legitimately conclude that the Wave Rider has given up, but the truth is rather different. She or he has simply let go. Not to be confused with a fatalistic withdrawal from life – this letting go has a very different quality. The commitment to the original passionate concern remains unshaken, and if anything, is deepened and intensified. Rather than fatalism, there is profound awareness and trust in the deep forces which drive towards completion and fulfillment. And of equal importance is a recognition that any "doing" in the sense of organizing, managing, forcing – will not only be ineffective, but may well be counter productive.


    Preserved 2011-11-06.
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    Image credit: Joan Thewlis CC-BY-NC-SA
    Wed, Nov 9, 2011  Permanent link
    Categories: collective intelligence, visionary, thrivability
    Sent to project: Polytopia
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