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Epiphanies
Joakim Dahlqvist (M, 44)
Milan, IT
Immortal since Jan 26, 2007
Uplinks: 0, Generation 1

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"Whatever you think I am, that is what I am not"
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    From joakim
    Free Will is Not an...
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    The Earth is the Place
    joakim’s project
    Epiphanies
    A series of rambles by SpaceCollective members sharing sudden insights and moments of clarity. Rambling is a time-proven way of thinking out loud,...
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    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    Raymond Tallis
    Free will is not an illusion


    The Enlightenment idea of conscious, freely acting individuals is worth defending against those who would reduce freedom to neuroscience

    "Collectivism sounds close to cultural determinism, which is no great advance on biological or material determinism. This is where biology, or our bodies anyway, come to the rescue. Yes, we are distanced from nature by the culture we have in common. But we are distanced from culture by our bodies. Our bodies have a unique trajectory through the material world and the cultural spaces we have collectively created. By this double distancing, we are free – to be temporally deep, elaborated selves that so many in the humanities insincerely deny exist, and to be those independent points of departure, that Lucien Goldmann spoke of. We are equipped therefore to act to liberate ourselves from the yoke of nature and the tyranny of custom, practice, and despots; and, even, from the unintended consequences of our best intentions."

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    Thu, Sep 27, 2007  Permanent link

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    A review of The Great Disruption by Zaki Laïdi

    “Expert consensus, rather than public consensus, underpins today’s political outlook”

    "... A political drama in which the tension is between the expert and the decision-maker has little room for ordinary people. Instead, the public is expected simply to accept and live with the wisdom of decisions taken by experts and government regulators. Expert consensus, rather than public consensus, is the driving force of new forms of governance.

    The main strength of The Great Disruption is that it shows how the outsourcing of authority to the expert and to international bodies leads to today’s peculiarly risk-averse and regulation-obsessed policymaking. Laїdi argues that the new, post-national governing bodies are drawn, almost spontaneously, towards talking up environmentalism as the principal political issue of the twenty-first century. He believes there are three reasons why the issue of the environment is being relentlessly politicised in Europe. ‘First, it is one of the fields that best lends itself to the production of new norms and standards’, he says. Second, it is a field where the ‘political construction of Europe can acquire greater legitimacy’. And third, ‘the environment is the pre-eminent area of shared sovereignty’. Thus, it is in this domain, in the area of the natural environment, that the outsourcing of authority to the scientist, expert and international organisations brings its greatest rewards.

    Unfortunately, Laїdi’s valuable insights into political sociology are undermined by his tendency to place faith in enlightened experts. He seems to be imprisoned in the contemporary technocratic imagination, which views the expert as the solution and the people as a problem. As a result, you will find little sympathy for populism or public debate in The Great Disruption. Instead, the argument seems to be that, because our world is so complex, we must place our allegiance in international civil society rather than in the people. Populist movements are dismissed out of hand. Laїdi believes that they arise ‘out of the desire to reduce the complexity of the world to simple issues’. Apparently, the simpletons in these populist movements must not be trusted in our ever-more complex globalised world.

    There is another way of making sense of the trends discussed by Laїdi. The voluntary relinquishing of sovereignty by European elites does not show that they are high-minded, forward-looking, enlightened internationalists. Rather, it is an attempt by an insecure oligarchy, which senses that its authority is feeble and falling apart, to disavow full responsibility for its actions. That is why governments today feel so much more at home hanging out in international civil society than they do engaging with their own ‘populist’ public."


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    Mon, Sep 24, 2007  Permanent link

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    Sun, Sep 16, 2007  Permanent link

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    Omnidirectional Treadmill
    Fri, Aug 10, 2007  Permanent link

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    Around the World - Daft Punk (Laromlab remix)

    Thu, Aug 9, 2007  Permanent link

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    A reminder. Watch the whole series.
    Sun, Aug 5, 2007  Permanent link

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    "...What this debate overlooks is that America and Britain left Iraq long ago – in spirit anyway. Politically and emotionally, if not physically, the Coalition of the Willing has already ‘cut and run’. Now, some want to make Western withdrawal a formal as well as a political reality, especially those who have been left behind in Iraq: military men such as Dannatt, and soldiers on the ground, many of whom keep blogs or even give interviews to the press in which they state their desire to leave (2). Iraq is a bloody mess, with a daily toll of horrific suicide and car bombings – but it was rising tensions between political and military officials in the US and the UK, rather than rising violence in Iraq, that precipitated the latest crisis."

    Brendan O’Neill - The phantom occupation of Iraq
    Wed, Aug 1, 2007  Permanent link

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    "This is why ethics would be better named - since it speaks Greek - a 'eu-oudénose', a smug nihilism.

    Againgst this we can set only that which is yet not being, but which our thought declares itself able to conceive.

    Every age - and in the end, none is worth more than any other - has its own figure of nihilism. The names change, but always under these names ('ethics for example) we find the articulation of conservative propaganda with an obscure desire for catastrophe.

    It is only by declaring that we want conservative decrees to be impossible, and by affirming truths against the desire for nothingness, that we tear ourselves away from nihilism. The possibility of the impossible, which is exposed by every loving encounter, every scientific re-foundation, every artistic invention and every sequence of emancipatory politics, is the sole principle - against the ethics of 'livingwell' whose real content is the deciding of death - of an ethics of truths."


    Alain Badou - Ethics (Chapter 3 - Ethics as a Figure of Nihilism)
    Mon, Jul 30, 2007  Permanent link

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    Intro to a great film
    Thu, Jul 26, 2007  Permanent link

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    Short film from 1976. Speed through Paris with a Ferrari 275 for a special rendezvous. Watch to the end.
    Tue, Jul 24, 2007  Permanent link

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