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Epiphanies
Joakim Dahlqvist (M, 45)
Milan, IT
Immortal since Jan 26, 2007
Uplinks: 0, Generation 1

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"Whatever you think I am, that is what I am not"
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    joakim’s project
    Epiphanies
    A series of rambles by SpaceCollective members sharing sudden insights and moments of clarity. Rambling is a time-proven way of thinking out loud,...
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    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    - Gilbert Keith Chesterton
    Thu, Apr 12, 2007  Permanent link

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    NEW ESSAY: How human thought and action are being stifled by a regime of uncertainty.

    Fear plays a key role in twenty-first century consciousness. Increasingly, we seem to engage with various issues through a narrative of fear. You could see this trend emerging and taking hold in the last century, which was frequently described as an ‘Age of Anxiety’ (1). But in recent decades, it has become more and better defined, as specific fears have been cultivated.

    The rise of catchphrases such as the ‘politics of fear’, ‘fear of crime’ and ‘fear of the future’ is testimony to the cultural significance of fear today. Many of us seem to make sense of our experiences through the narrative of fear. Fear is not simply associated with high-profile catastrophic threats such as terrorist attacks, global warming, AIDS or a potential flu pandemic; rather, as many academics have pointed out, there are also the ‘quiet fears’ of everyday life.

    According to Phil Hubbard, in his 2003 essay ‘Fear and loathing at the multiplex: everyday anxiety in the post-industrial city’, ambient fear ‘saturates the social spaces of everyday life’ (2). Brian Massumi echoes this view with his concept of ‘low-grade fear’ (3). In recent years, questions about fear and anxiety have been raised in relation to a wide variety of issues: the ascendancy of risk consciousness (4), fear of the urban environment (5), fear of crime (6), fear of the Other (7), the amplification of fear through the media (8), fear as a distinct discourse (9), the impact of fear on law (10), the relationship between fear and politics (11), fear as a ‘culture’ (12), and the question of whether fear constitutes a ‘distinctive cultural form’ (13)

    Fear is often examined in relation to specific issues; it is rarely considered as a sociological problem in its own right....

    Continue reading on Spiked...
    Wed, Apr 4, 2007  Permanent link

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    Tue, Mar 27, 2007  Permanent link

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    Mon, Mar 26, 2007  Permanent link

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    "Or, as Saint-Just put it succinctly: "That which produces the general good is always terrible." [3] These words should not be interpreted as a warning against the temptation to impose violently the general good onto a society, but, on the contrary, as a bitter truth to be fully endorsed. - The further crucial point to bear in mind is that, for Robespierre, revolutionary terror is the very opposite of war: Robespierre was a pacifist, not out of hypocrisy or humanitarian sensitivity, but because he was well aware that war among nations as a rule serves as the means to obfuscate revolutionary struggle within each nation. Robespierre's speech "On war" is of special importance today: it shows him as a true pacifist who ruthlessly denounces the patriotic call to war, even if the war is formulated as the defense of the Revolution, as the attempt of those who want "revolution without revolution" to divert the radicalization of the revolutionary process. His stance is thus the exact opposite of those who need war to militarize social life and take dictatorial control over it. [4] Which is why Robespierre also denounced the temptation to export revolution to other countries, forcefully "liberating" them: "The French are not afflicted with a mania for rendering any nation happy and free against its will. All the kings could have vegetated or died unpunished on their blood-spattered thrones, if they had been able to respect the French people's independence."

    An article on Robespierre by Slavoj Zizek
    Mon, Mar 26, 2007  Permanent link

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    A top secret film shot by the CIA of a naval burial performed by the US Navy for six Soviet submariners found dead in the water. Listen to the words of the officiator.

    "The story leaked and the press were hounding Washington. The CIA Boss at the time admitted to a Congressional Hearing they had brought up pieces of the submarine, including 6 bodies, which were given a videoed Soviet Naval Burial. The film of this burial was later given to Russian President Boris Yeltzin after the Cold War had ended as a gesture, by the CIA director, of reconciliation. Yeltzin cried when he saw the video. At the time of the press leak Moscow made no comment to the newspaper stories and, behind the scenes, asked the then President, Gerald Ford, to hush it from their side and the Russians would do the same. Ford readily agreed. Russia publicly announced that as all their submarines were in port, they could not have lost one. They made no further comment and nothing else was heard from either side on the matter."
    Mon, Mar 26, 2007  Permanent link

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    Mon, Mar 19, 2007  Permanent link

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    Brasseye special about paedophiles. Brilliant (and controversial) satire from Chris Morris.
    Mon, Mar 19, 2007  Permanent link

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    A new documentary series by Adam Curtis. A continuation of 'The Power of Nightmares'

    BitTorrent File of Episide One
    BitTorrent File of Episode Two

    Interview with Adam Curtis
    Sun, Mar 18, 2007  Permanent link

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    I highly recommend this documentary series. Try to find it.
    Sun, Mar 18, 2007  Permanent link

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