Comments:


Olena     Fri, Jan 29, 2010  Permanent link
I really love that you describe it as being a "floating head";
I think we are/becoming that in more than one way, certainly.
Spot on.
Morningstar     Sun, Jan 31, 2010  Permanent link
Thanks Megan, beautiful and intimate reflection.
Manuel Dahm     Mon, Feb 1, 2010  Permanent link
Hey there,

I very much appreciated your words, thank you.

It reminded me very much of a year in university when we media design students made a project together with the university of dance in Frankfurt.

The geeks and the body gods. It was so odd to feel this incredible different energy from the 2 groups. Luckily we had a great and experienced teacher who had structured the class very well. We had dance workshops with them! The geeks had to dance as well, all of them. No pressure needed, it was pure curiosity. And after a couple of hours, we were a mass of entangled bodies, communicating without words, using the primal language that we all speak, but during the course of our lives learn to forget.
We have to unforget.

The class was a blast and I believe everyone was really happy with the process and results. I still like a little offspring I did back in the day with a dancer, reverse engineering dance to sound:http://manueldahm.com/#/Frei/KlickTanz

Anyway, it has gotten to me as well in the last years, after 10 years of interactive work, computer work, word work that my body has been maltreated in all of this.

I used to love sports, skateboarding, hockey, basketball, soccer, judo, windsurfing, snowboarding, you name it...but I had forgotten about my body, started to smoke from all the stress and gotten some nice luxurious fat around my belly. But it came back to me by starting wave surfing some years ago, unknown body sensations. Then I started yoga. Then I stopped smoking and eating meat. And so many things happened from there. I believe that our body sometimes can tell us more about our soul, heart and mind then our mind itself. If you listen closely, there is some real wisdom in your body, and it can connect you with things you wouldnt find easily otherwise.

And when you wake up to the real possibilities it offers, you can start to really talk with it.
Its a precious asset, your mind and soul and heart reside in it. Yet our science and cyber age completely forgets about this. Its all rational these days. Maybe that's why so many things are going in a strange direction, faster and faster, with this world.

A mind without an awake and healthy body cannot be connected with others truly and not with the earth we live in and the creatures that live with us.
meganmay     Tue, Feb 9, 2010  Permanent link
As it happens, when asked to think about the future, people tend to lean forward :)
rene     Tue, Feb 9, 2010  Permanent link
One of the most interesting dynamic exchanges between body and mind is the interplay between hand gestures and verbal articulation whereby the hands not only serve as emphasis and punctuation but also energize and interact with the thought process itself.

I find this a particularly interesting under-exposed art form because of the body's unconscious spontaneity which is perfectly synchronized with the thoughts taking shape in the moment..

Obviously there is a great deal of additional body language going on in human encounters, but in many instances the gestural communication aspires to the level of artistry.

According to Wikipedia, "Research has suggested that between 60 and 70 percent of all meaning is derived from nonverbal behavior."


Manuel Dahm     Sun, Feb 21, 2010  Permanent link
Rene, thanks for this inspiration. I noticed how, whilst dancing, surfing, longboarding or especially snowboarding my motion becomes much more integrated when I direct myself with my hands, sort of making them the conductor to my movements. Obviously I shall try that with talking as well...curious!
Xarene     Thu, Feb 25, 2010  Permanent link
Before reading your post, I added this link from NYT to my post—follow up on Rene's comment on non-verbal communication, in particular, touch.

I like how you took us through a few body-out-of-body experiences.
meganmay     Sun, Feb 28, 2010  Permanent link
Just read the NYT post, thanks Xarene. Here's another little mind-body finding:

Recent studies in neurology and neuropsychology on mental imagery have further questioned the "mind as serial computer" theory, arguing instead that human mental imagery is both visually and motorically embodied (see motor imagery). For example, several studies provided evidence that people are slower at rotating line drawings of objects such as hands in directions incompatible with the joints of the human body (Parsons 1987; 2003), and that patients with painful injured arms are slower at mentally rotating line drawings of the hand from the side of the injured arm (Schwoebel et al. 2001).

from Mental Images on Wiki

Olena     Thu, Feb 17, 2011  Permanent link
Megan, this is directed to your new post, Our Primordial Future, but you've disabled comments?

Anyway, I enjoyed that, and it made me think of a particular conversation in a book I'm currently reading — especially the last bit when you ask if "it" will look more like us, or we like it? You might be interested. The book is Science is Culture, and the conversation is between Jill Tarter & Will Wright; Wright mentions our genetic similarity to a fruit fly, "We share so much with a fruit fly it's ridiculous" and they compare it to our relationship with our future "purely designed entities": "So they'll recognize us as their progenitors, but we won't recognize them as our descendants", like the way fruit flies don't recognize us.

I think I'm going to transcribe a few talks or excerpts from these talks onto the OS when I'm done reading. There's some really great stuff being said.
meganmay     Thu, Feb 17, 2011  Permanent link
Wow, it's been so long since I posted I didn't realize you had to check a box to make comments happen. The fruit fly analogy is amazing. I've often wondered when will we actually know when this ultra-intelligent AI has arrived?, and clearly, insofar as we're capable of defining intelligence, it already kind of is. It is strange to think that in the process of trying to understand ourselves we're creating something beyond ourselves, which ultimately understand us better than we ever will...that is if it stays as interested in us as we are in the fruitfly....then again, how do we know how much the fruitfly knows about itself...in any case, looking forward to reading some excerpts on the OS :)




Olena     Fri, Feb 18, 2011  Permanent link
Funny; what you said made me wonder how it might be if those beings start to talk to us, about us. It would be like prophecy, like being visited by aliens or like those New Age meditators who claim to embody otherworldly beings while in their trance. Would anyone believe you if an AI gave you all the answers?
     Fri, Feb 18, 2011  Permanent link
Reminds me of this:

 http://spacecollective.org/michaelerule/6579/Molecular-Experience