Comments:


sonicport+techfolder     Thu, Mar 25, 2010  Permanent link
As an abstraction exercise I simulate in my mind two or more physical states that cannot actually exist at the same time while also maintaining physical effort such as running. The brain is a muscle and I believe the mind's access of abstract simulation is strongly related to muscle memory and focus. I don't know much about these scientific experiments but some difficulties in quantising our body movements in 3D space are based on our knowledge and intelligence at perceiving what our body does between all the movements between high and low, tension and release and knowing which extreme is 1, and which is 0 based on all the co-ordinates of the joints in the human skeleton. The need to label the extremes between high and low to measure them is a big part of the problem in my view, as we remember our body gestures by mapping memory points of the physical feeling of tension and release in different muscles in our body. Maybe this mapping of senses can be visualised, re-arranged an played with without the need of biological mechanisms.
johnrod     Thu, Mar 25, 2010  Permanent link
This might apply to biometrics. Abstractions arise from mind, body, society and environment due to innate, learned and dynamic conditions. Behaviors can be used to categorize, group and personalize, or to figure out sources of variations in repeated measurements. Also see cognitive philosophy. Thanks.
gamma     Thu, Mar 25, 2010  Permanent link
we remember our body gestures by mapping memory points of the physical feeling of tension and release in different muscles in our body

I think that the article is interesting, because it demonstrates the division of the brain into parcels (pizza cuts?) so large, that they contain the slices of the periphery (such as the leg or the arm). The realization helps us conceive (comprehend) the experience of one's own body as a virtual image (or object) - hence, an abstraction. In translation, we can sense that the body is within the brain.

gamma     Thu, Mar 25, 2010  Permanent link
Also see cognitive philosophy.

I am not sure why Wikipedia has little information about the frontal lobe cortex?

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frontal_cortex 
johnrod     Thu, Mar 25, 2010  Permanent link
Homunculus is a term used for this type of abstraction, including cortical.
gamma     Fri, Mar 26, 2010  Permanent link
Homunculus is a term used for this type of abstraction, including cortical.

Very interesting. You know I was thinking about the frontal cortex, because I keep reading the articles that say how the abstract thinking is located in the frontal lobe...
gamma     Fri, Mar 26, 2010  Permanent link
The Brain From Top To Bottom:
http://thebrain.mcgill.ca

(does not explicitly end with the bottom)