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Design Media Arts at UCLA
Peter Ng (M)
South Pasadena, US
Immortal since Mar 29, 2007
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    From petergng
    Final Visuals + Sounds
    petergng’s project
    Design Media Arts at UCLA
    In the 1970s space colonies were considered to be a viable alternative to a life restricted to planet Earth. The design of cylindrical space...
    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.


    3d Rendering of the healing spa structure. It provides 6 different chakra experiences inside the structure.
    Wed, Jun 6, 2007  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Design Media Arts at UCLA
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    Wed, May 23, 2007  Permanent link

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    First Rendering of our Space.

    Solving the afflictions of a claustrophobic space colony, we have come up with the idea of the Open. When I say claustrophobia , I am referring to the closed colony and space, but more importantly the claustrophobia of freedom and creativity. In a closed environment is is very easy for their to be no variety in life. You will wake up and look up into the sky and find that it looks the same every day.

    The Open is an idea which embraces freedom, diversity, and growth. It opens up the mind and ideas.

    The Structure
    A blossoming plant serves as the foundation of the structure.
    Sun, May 20, 2007  Permanent link

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    Mon, May 7, 2007  Permanent link

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    knowledge/resources/energy/happiness/pain(emotions)/evolution/purebred/muts/integration

    Further into the sphere it is unified and integrated, whereas further outside of the sphere it is diversified.

    As opposed to the Earth, we are all stuck on the outside and on its surface. In this world we are not on the same limitations. We are able to travel into the core of things and find deeper understanding and will not be shielded away from the rest of the world.
    Mon, Apr 16, 2007  Permanent link

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    Gregor Mendel's work provided the first firm basis for the idea that heredity occurred in discrete units. He noticed several traits in peas that occur in only one of two forms (e.g., the peas were either "round" or "wrinkled"), and was able to show that the traits were: heritable (passed from parent to offspring); discrete (i.e., if one parent had round peas and the other wrinkled, the progeny were not intermediate, but either round or wrinkled); and distributed to progeny in a well-defined and predictable manner (Mendelian inheritance). His research laid the foundation for the concept of discrete heritable traits, known today as genes.

    The concepts involved in Mendel's experiments have been found to have wide applicability, and most complex traits have been found to be polygenetic and not controlled by single-unit characters. Mendel's ideas replaced the notion of "blending inheritance" prevalent at the time Darwin wrote The Origin of Species, and answered the long-standing problem of the persistence of variation within populations.

    Later research gave a physical basis to the notion of genes, and eventually identified DNA as the heritable material, with genes re-defined and functioning as discrete regions within DNA. DNA is not perfectly copied, and rare mistakes (mutations) in genes can affect traits that the genes control (e.g., pea shape).

    A gene can have modifications such as DNA methylation, which do not change the nucleotide sequence of a gene, but do result in the epigenetic inheritance of a change in the expression of that gene in a trait. Another epigenetic mechanism is via microRNA and RNA interference, which serve regulatory roles in gene transcription and translation.

    Non-DNA based forms of heritable variation exist, such as transmission of the secondary structures of prions or structural inheritance of patterns in the rows of cilia in protozoans such as Paramecium[13] and Tetrahymena.[14] Investigations continue into whether these mechanisms allow for the production of specific beneficial heritable variation in response to environmental signals. If this were shown to be the case, then some instances of evolution would lie outside of the typical Mendelian framework, which avoids any connection between environmental signals and the production of heritable variation. However, the processes that produce these variations are rather rare, often reversible, and leave the genetic information intact.
    Mon, Apr 16, 2007  Permanent link

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    Variation

    Evolution consists of two basic types of processes: those that introduce new genetic variation into a population, and those that affect the frequencies of existing alleles.[15] Mutations in genetic material, migration between populations (gene flow), and the reshuffling of genes during sexual reproduction (genetic recombination) create variation in organisms. In some organisms, like bacteria and plants, variation is also produced by the mixing of genetic material between different species in horizontal gene transfer and hybridization. Genetic drift and natural selection act on this variation by increasing or decreasing the frequency of traits: genetic drift does so randomly, while natural selection does so based on whether a trait increases fitness (reproductive success).

    The heritable portion of an individual's apparent traits, or phenotype, is primarily the result of the specific genetic makeup, or genotype, encoded on DNA/protein constructs called chromosomes. Thus, the variation in heritable traits within a population reflects the variation in genetic makeup. A specific location on a chromosome is known as a locus; a variant of a DNA sequence at a given locus is an allele. The modern evolutionary synthesis defines evolution as the change over time in the relative frequencies of alleles in a population.

    Genetic variation is often the result of a new mutation in a single individual (usually point mutations, insertions, or deletions); in subsequent generations, the frequency of that variant may fluctuate in the population, becoming more or less prevalent relative to other alleles at the site. All evolutionary forces act by driving this change in allele frequency in one direction or another. Variation disappears when an allele reaches the point of fixation — when it either reaches a frequency of zero and disappears from the population, or reaches a frequency of one and replaces the ancestral allele entirely. Most sites in the complete DNA sequence, or genome, of a species are identical in all individuals in the population. Consequently, relatively small genotypic changes can lead to dramatic phenotypic ones. Sites with more than one allele are called polymorphic, or segregating, sites. Polymorphism leads to distinct groups of traits arising within the same species, such as different hair colors or sexes. Interactions between a genotype and the environment may also affect the phenotype, as reflected in developmental and phenotypic plasticity.
    Mon, Apr 16, 2007  Permanent link

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    The World
    by Nakheel Properties // concept by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum

    A place where a person can rule his own land. Rule part of the world as if it were his own.

    "The World is a man-made archipeligo of 300 islands in the shape of a world map currently being built off the coast of Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The World is one of a series of artificial island projects in Dubai, along with the Palm Islands, and like the other islands The World is being built primarily using sand dredged from the sea.

    Each island ranges from 23,000 m² to 84,000 m² (250,000–900,000 square feet or 5.74–20.66 acres) in size, with 50–100 m of water between each island. The development will cover an area of 9 km in length and 6 km in width, surrounded by an oval breakwater. The only means of transport between the islands will be by boat and helicopter. Prices for the islands will range from $15 million (USD) to $45 million (USD). The average price for an island will be around $25 million (USD). Dredging started in 2004 and in March of 2007 The World is around 90% complete."
    Wed, Apr 11, 2007  Permanent link

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    Powers of Ten
    by Charles and Ray Eames

    A film which shows the viewer how small and at the same time how big and endless it is.
    Wed, Apr 11, 2007  Permanent link

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    First Commercial Plant For Biodegradable Plastic

    The first 100% biodegradable plastic is ready for commercial-scale production.

    As opposed to petroleum-derived plastics, biodegradable plastics are made up of polymers called polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), which are produced in genetically engineered microbial and plant biofactories.
    Wed, Apr 11, 2007  Permanent link

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