MoonUnit  
Thu, Nov 15, 2007
Permanent link
SPACE STATION: Timeline of stations prior to the ISS
Project: ET2 Architecture?
Timeline of Stations Prior to the ISS




CNN Article on the History of Space Stations

Summary of article:

-NASA has reported the first proposal for a space station was in 1869 by a science fiction writer. The writer's name was unmentioned, but they described a "brick moon" orbiting the Earth to aid ships in navigating the ocean.

-In 1923, Romanian Hermann Oberth was the first to use the term "space station" for his wheel-like facility that would help launch astronauts to the moon and Mars.

-In 1971, the Russians Salyut 1 was the first station launched in space. First crew to board the ship on a seperate launch failed to enter the ship due to their inability to open the hatch. The second crew was able to enter but died after an airleak appeared.

-The Russians over the next decade sent up many more Salyut stations which taught scientist if sustaining human life in space for a long period of time was possible. Although travel in a space ship created uncomfortable effects after 16 days, the space station could overcome this unpleasant effect if it gained artificial gravity. In essence, stations in space could take on the goal as making space life more luxurious.

-In 1973, just two years after the launch of the Salyut1, the U.S. got involved and launched their own station called Skylab. Skylab only remained active for a year before it was abandoned and came crashing down into an Australian Desert killing a cow.

-It seemed while the U.S. focused on shorterm missions, the Russians dedicated time to finding out ways to extend human life duration in space.

-1986 the first module to the MIR station was launched. It was able to keep cosmonaut Valery Polyakov up in space for a record of 438 days.

-By 1999 the MIR station was retired.

Salyut 6 info








Thu, Nov 15, 2007  Permanent link

Sent to project: ET2 Architecture?
  RSS for this post
  Promote (1)
  
  Add to favorites
Create synapse