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Emergence and Navigating...
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  • rhymeandreason’s project
    Emergence and Navigating...
    Develop a generative, emergent process to fill space (2D or 3D) using only black lines. Modify a known process or invent your own. Implement your...
    Now playing SpaceCollective
    Where forward thinking terrestrials share ideas and information about the state of the species, their planet and the universe, living the lives of science fiction. Introduction
    Featuring Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames, based on an idea by Kees Boeke.
    As ideas for what to represent using the navigation system I came up with, I decided to tackle the idea of "webspace". In brief, each individual's browsing preferences make up their "webspace", which can be thought of as the collected places one frequents on the web.
    Each individual is represented with their own plane, and these can be navigated side to side or flipped through. Each plane presents content extracted from certain websites, as chosen according to preference.
    (To put it in most basic terms, it is a side-scrolling RSS reader, although that was not the direct intention.)
    Each "plane" is ideally supposed to be customizable its user, much along the lines of the Yahoo! homepage, or the iGoogle homepage.


    a video documentation of my project:






    For now, it functions adequately as a prototype, but does need further polishing. For functionality, it would best be executed in a web platform, to make use of the features an internet browser already provides, since parsing xml in Java is less than ideal.
    Also, it would be great to have true chat functionality, so there could be a "public plane" where you could gather with friends online.
    Of course, since I don't know how to do that, this is what I have right now. ;P
    I'm thinking about how to refine the text display, because placing them in columns made sense initially since I thought they were easy to read that way. But now I'm thinking maybe it could be more free-flowing, and alternate between regular and italic text. It could have an interesting graffitti-ish sensibility this way, but I don't know how readable it will be.

    So, I tried a different approach, this time with the text as the focus and stepping away from using the skyline idea.



    I kind of liked the novelty in the first version, although I thought the fading in and out in this version is a good revision. (it's hard to see in the video, unfortunately). This version doesn't have the image feature, since the tint doesn't work well with that, and I got rid of the buttons, since they weren't doing much. video:





    Wed, Mar 12, 2008  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Emergence and Navigating Space
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    Firstly: my initial navigation concept sketch, to shed a little light on the following madness:

    I'm calling it 2.5-D side-scroll, since it's side-scroll with the addition of being able to go through each of the layers.

    Now here are images:






    There have been numerous "visualizations" of the what the internet is...(here is one that focuses on html tags, and one that focuses on keyword tags)...but if we visualize the internet in less abstract terms, we would most likely arrive at things akin to the "pixel city" renderings done by artist eboy and also appearing elsewhere on the web. The pixel city method makes use of isometric projection, itself a sort of 2.5-D.



    Mon, Feb 11, 2008  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Emergence and Navigating Space
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    Printed image from program:

    cropped detail from image above:

    Full print was printed at 70cm by 100cm from a pdf file generated at 1400px by 2000px with 650 objects drawn, (and a couple other slight modifications). Significantly, the print differs from the screen version because enlarging the size of the canvas in which the program draws makes its tendency to create "clumping" more apparent.
    You can also see in the closeup that everything is drawn with very thin lines. Since the base program draws everything in a series of points, using lines instead of points was a sensical extension that also makes overlapping more apparent.
    Wed, Feb 6, 2008  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Emergence and Navigating Space
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    Having much enjoyed Jared Tarbell's Substrate program (http://complexification.net/gallery/machines/substrate/), I set out to make my own drawing process along similar lines. It draws a circle with two tangent lines, then when one tangent line hits something, a new circle is drawn tangent to this line and two tangent lines are drawn to the circle...









    view original applet here:  http://classes.dma.ucla.edu/Winter08/152A/projects/mary/index.html 
    Sun, Jan 27, 2008  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Emergence and Navigating Space
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    [This is more than one idea, because I don't know what will work.]
    This idea was inspired by Jared Tarbell's "Substrate", which is a very simple process that creates a lot of depth. I figured his method of using tangent lines could be applied to circles with significantly different results.
    Starting with a circle, two tangent lines are drawn. Another circle is drawn that is also tangent to these two lines. Another tangent line is drawn to this circle. When tangent lines intersect, a circle is drawn that is tangent to them...and on and on...
    To break up the harshness of the lines, circles and lines would be composed of "chains" of varying circles.




    "Vehicles" travel around randomly, leaving behind trails. When two vehicles collide, an area is created that the other vehicles must then avoid. This would cause an ever decreasing amount of space in which the vehicles could travel, so would probably create small clumps near the edges of the composition where there are heavy amounts of lines. Or it might become a "swiss cheese" type of pattern. (This is similar to Casey's piece with Brattenberg Vehicles; hopefully, the difference will make it significantly different.)



    The above images are from the site http://kisrael.com/2007/10/21,  which is a 3D interpretation of Conway's game of life. I like the idea here of simply displaying consecutive generations of a running of the game of life in a 3D space, instead of creating a game of life that works on a 3D grid. The method here really allows us to appreciate familiar game of life patterns in a new way.
    Yet, I think there could be more exploration to further the aesthetic possibilities that this method allows. As seen in the screenshots, the game of life patterns create intriguing 3D forms that resemble buildings and organic-looking structures. I made a quick sketch to show how simple alterations in presenting the layers of generations can create large differences to how the piece looks. I think choosing a large complex Life pattern to start will be important.
    Wed, Jan 16, 2008  Permanent link

    Sent to project: Emergence and Navigating Space
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    Found image: This is a Tesseract, or hypercube, which is a 4-dimensional figure. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesseract) Where a square is 2-D, and a cube is 3-D and made up of squares, a hypercube is then 4-D and made up of cubes. In mathematics, it is feasible to have any number of nth-dimensions, but such figures cannot exist in physical space so we can only make representations of them in attempts to visualize the concept. This visualization presents the hypercube in a 2 axis rotation, which is interesting because the outside becomes the inside and the inside the outside.


    New image: This is the Bubelle dress by Phillips as part of their SKIN line of emotive clothing.
    (http://www.design.philips.com/probes/projects/dresses/index.page)
    According to Phillips, the line conceptualizes fashion for 2020, in which "emotion sensors" embedded in the clothing offer new ways for people to display their emotions through their clothing. In the Bubelle dress, the sensors trigger miniature projectors on the inner layer of the dress that create a colored light effect on the outer layer of the dress. Apparently, calm moods create blue tones and stressed moods create reds and oranges.
    The dress is beautiful; the design is ingenious and definitely deserving of having won one of Time's Invention of the Year awards, but I must wonder at the real feasibility of its design intentions. After all, you really can't anticipate fashion for 2020, because fashion is fickle and in no way progresses linearly. And, the design rests on displaying your emotions on your clothes, but most people regularly try to hide their emotions. While people do choose clothes for aesthetic enjoyment instead of just for functionality, I think few would want to wear their heart on their sleeve.
    Sun, Jan 13, 2008  Permanent link
    Categories: DESMA 152a
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